Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who is responsible for providing interpreter services?
  2. How much does it cost?
  3. When do I need 2 interpreters?
  4. Could someone in the local community who knows sign language be used to interpret?
  5. What if there are no interpreters available in my local area for an assignment?
  6. What if we do not have funds to pay for interpreter services?
  7. Should I book an interpreter in advance?
  8. I have to cancel my doctor’s appointment. Will SDHHNS call the doctor and cancel the appointment for me?
  9. I will be making an appointment at my bank. How do I make sure I have an interpreter for that appointment?
  10. When I book an interpreter, will you be able to tell me at that time who my interpreter will be?

1. Who is responsible for providing interpreter services?

Providing interpreting services is the responsibility of the person or organization providing the programs or services to which the Deaf or hard of hearing person requires access.

2. How much does it cost?

  • Please contact the SDHHNS Interpreting Services Coordinator in your region for the hourly and daily rates.

3. When do I need 2 interpreters?

Depending on the type or duration of the assignment two interpreters may be required. Interpreting puts a physical and mental demand on interpreters and as such, each interpreter will normally interpret in 20-minute rotations. For most assignments over one hour in duration two interpreters will be required. This can be discussed with the interpreter services coordinator at the time of the booking.

4. Could someone in the local community who knows sign language be used to interpret?

Interpreters who work for SDHHNS are graduates of a recognized interpreter training program and members of a professional organization, Maritime Association of Professional Sign Language Interpreters (MAPSLI). They abide by a code of ethics and guidelines which includes professional accountability, professional competence, integrity in professional relations and integrity in business practices. An unqualified person who knows sign language would not have the professional training or be bound by the professional requirements of the interpreting profession.

5. What if there are no interpreters available in my local area for an assignment?

SDHHNS will strive to provide interpreters from within the area of the assignment. However, given the high demand for interpreting services, the geographical location of the assignment, and the nature of the assignment, there are times when there is a need to book interpreters from another area to meet the requirements of the assignment.

6. What if we do not have funds to pay for interpreter services?

The provision of sign language interpreter services is a key part of equality of access and accommodation for Deaf and hard of hearing people. As such it is the responsibility of the program and service provider to ensure funds are available for sign language interpreter services.

7. Should I book an interpreter in advance?

Approximately one to two weeks notice is preferable. SDHHNS will however make every effort to book an interpreter with less than two weeks notice.

8. I have to cancel my doctor’s appointment. Will SDHHNS call the doctor and cancel the appointment for me?

SDHHNS will cancel the interpreter. You are responsible for contacting the doctor and cancelling your appointment with the doctor.

9. I will be making an appointment at my bank. How do I make sure I have an interpreter for that appointment?

When you book an appointment at your bank you can inform the bank that you need an interpreter. Please ask the bank to call the SDHHNS interpreter services coordinator in your area to book an interpreter for you.

10. When I book an interpreter, will SDHHNS be able to confirm who the interpreter will be?

SDHHNS will attempt to book your interpreter of choice and let you know right away. However, we may need time to confirm the interpreter’s schedule before we can let you know who the interpreter will be.